Buy a book for a prisoner at 50% off. 
Enter LOVETHRUBARS at check out and you'll receive a 50% discount on everything.

Books have always made a difference, particularly to those behind bars. The most famous example is that of Malcolm X who attributes his transformation to reading first the dictionary and then anything he could get his hands on in his prison cell. ‘Anyone who has read a great deal can imagine the new world that opened. Let me tell you something: from then until I left that prison, in every free moment I had, if I was not reading in the library, I was reading on my bunk. You couldn’t have gotten me out of books with a wedge,’ he recalled in his autobiography. ‘In fact, up to then, I never had been so truly free in my life.’

Poet Reginald Dwayne Betts was placed in solitary confinement because the jail lacked space for incoming adolescents. A book by James Baldwin sustained him through his ten days in isolation. Two years later, while in solitary confinement (again), someone slid Dudley Randall’s “The Black Poets” under his cell door. Betts was eighteen years old. The book changed his life. ‘From that point on, I decided that I was going to be a poet.’ Now age thirty four, he has since published a memoir about coming of age in prison, written two books of poetry, gone on to get his undergraduate and MFA degrees, and is finishing law school.

Books can be a lifeline to people in prison. That lifeline doesn’t always get profiled—not every person becomes an award-winning poet or writer, stages headline-grabbing mass hunger strikes, or becomes a legacy. But for people locked away, sometimes without human contact and sometimes with all-too-much human contact, books can provide a pathway to possibilities.
— Vikki Law, author of Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women

Instructions
Order a book from our site and we’ll send the book to (1) the specific prisoner you want, (2) to a list of prisoners who have requested our books, (3) to a request list of prisoners that NYC Books Thru Bars has, or (4) to the waiting list that AK Press & Distribution has for its prisoner support program. 

Important: If you have a particular prisoner to whom you would like us to send books, please list their name and address as the shipping address when you place your order. You must be sure to get their permission first and make sure that the place they are incarcerated will accept books. If you don’t have a particular person in mind, no worries! We will send your purchases to a list of prisoners who have requested books.

Quote from Vikki Law, "What does a book have to do with a movement?" Waging Nonviolence, September 15, 2015